Archives for December 2011

Work Related Neck Pain

work related neck painWork related neck pain is becoming more common these days with more of our jobs becoming computer-based. If most of your day is spent at a computer, pay attention to how you are sitting.

Are you sitting with your shoulders slumped and your head extended toward your computer monitor? And are you in that position for long periods of time? Better watch out- you may soon be on the hunt for some neck pain relief.

Jobs High Risk for Work Related Neck Pain

The research indicates that women in general are at high risk for work related neck pain. Many women with neck pain develop chronic neck pain which is pain lasting more than a month. The most common affliction is called trapezius myalgia, which is a chronic muscular pain and tightness that extends down the back of the neck and moves out toward the shoulders.

Jobs that may lead to chronic neck pain are those that require repetitive work, typically at computer keyboards. These jobs are primarily in administrative offices, post offices, and banks. In these positions, there is overuse and misuse of the neck and shoulder muscles.

Treatment of Work Related Neck Pain

The usual treatments for chronic neck pain include massage, chiropractic treatment, medications, electrical nerve stimulation and exercises of various kinds. The response to these treatments varies and is somewhat inconsistent. As a result, there has been a lot of research into neck pain treatment. And the evidence is building on the effectiveness of neck strengthening exercises.

Neck Pain Relief With Strengthening Exercises

At the National Research Center for the Working Environment in Copenhagen, Danish scientists completed a study to determine the most effective treatment for women suffering from the work related neck pain caused by trapezius myalgia. Study participants were assigned one of these three treatments:

  • Strength training focusing on the neck and shoulder muscles
  • General fitness training in the form of riding an exercise bike without holding on to the handlebars
  • Health counseling

The two groups that exercised did so three times a week for 20 minutes each and for a total of 10 weeks.

The results? The group receiving the strength training had, on average, a 75% reduction in the pain they felt during the study period and for 10 weeks following the study. The women receiving the general fitness training had slight improvements. The group receiving the health counseling reported no improvements in their work related neck pain.

If you are suffering from chronic work related neck pain, or if you at a risk for it, you may want to check with your doctor about seeing a physical therapist for training in neck-strengthening exercises.

Dealing With Neck Pain

Dealing with neck pain can seem to be a pain in the neck, there may be some rather simple changes you can do in your daily living that can help to prevent or at least minimize the pain and discomfort that you feel.

Dealing with Neck Pain

Dealing with Neck Pain
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Most of us, at some point in our life, experience stiff neck pain. Neck pain can radiate to the back and shoulders and can cause headaches. It can be caused by muscle tension and spasm or inflammation of the tendons and ligaments.

There are different types of neck pain and  a lot of reasons why neck pain occurs. It can be as simple as placing your neck in an awkward position like sleeping with your neck twisted the wrong way or sleeping on your stomach. Severe stiff neck pain, on the other hand, can be caused by a blow to the neck or whiplash.

Degenerative disorders like arthritis are among the various causes of stiff neck. If nerves in the neck are damaged, the nerves may be pinched and that can cause neck pain, tingling in the arms and hands and numbness. Stiff neck pain symptoms such as these need immediate medical attention to prevent permanent nerve damage.

   Simple Tips As What To Do For Neck Pain

If you notice that your stiff neck pain gets worse as your day progresses, this can be caused by improper posture. If so, here are some simple tips that could help you out:

  • If you are using your phone almost all the time, it is best to consider using a headset or speaker phone.
  • Avoid sitting for a long period of time. Change position as often as you could. Take time to get up and walk.
  • Make sure that when you are sitting, that your back is properly supported.
  • Alter the position of your computer monitor so it is slightly below eye level and you are sitting forward and looking directly at the monitor.
  • Stay away from looking down when you are reading.

If, perhaps, you are experiencing neck pain as soon as you wake up in the morning:

  • Avoid sleeping on your stomach.
  • Look for a pillow that can provide support to your neck.
  • You can also roll up a towel and place it in an ideal height to support your neck

There are a few measures that you can seek in order to prevent or reduce any temporary or minor pain.  These include the following:

  • Walking- this can help to prevent and relieve neck pain.  Walking is also excellent for back pain.  Several short walks during the day would do.
  • Apply an icepack to the back of your neck.  Do this for about ten minutes, several times a day.  Continue treatment for several days.
  • Try ibuprofen, or acetaminophen.  Remember that aspirin must never be given to anyone under twenty-one years of age.
  • Massage therapy can be quite effective for dealing with neck pain.

A simple exercise to help relieve neck pain can also be done standing or sitting. Exercises like holding the head erect, tucking in your chin and glide your head back is a very helpful exercise.  Hold it for six seconds and then glide it back.  Repeat this exercise six times but do not bend the head onward during this exercise.

Caution When Dealing With Neck Pain

What to do for stiff neck pain can be simple but, if you have constant neck pain or it gets worse, particularly if it’s accompanied by headache or fever, or if even minor pain does not improve within a few days, check with your family physician.

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